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In The News Carolina Eyecare Physicians is GROWING!

With the addition of world-renowned eye surgeon Kerry Solomon, MD, and Sidney Seltzer, MD, ... Read more.

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CAROLINA EYECARE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Bringing Tomorrow’s Technology to Today’s Patients

“Carolina Eyecare Research Institute is one of the lowcountry’s largest privately-held ophthalmology research centers. From investigating better surgical techniques and therapeutic treatments, to testing new medical devices, our state-of-the-art research center is focused on testing and improving new technologies and procedures for cataract surgery, refractive lens surgery, LASIK vision correction, and improving treatment for glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.”

-The Physicians at Carolina Eyecare

Our Mission

“The Carolina Eyecare Research Institute is committed to advancing the field of ophthalmology with progressive, groundbreaking studies that improve not only our patients quality of life from Charleston and around the low country, but also those around the world. Our goal is to bring tomorrow’s technology to today’s patients.”

-Dr. Kerry Solomon, Director; Carolina Eyecare Research Institute

About the Director

Kerry Solomon, MDDr. Kerry D. Solomon is the first Director of the Carolina Eyecare Research Institute at Carolina Eyecare Physicians in Charleston, SC. He has been a leader, an innovator and a pioneer with cataract and refractive surgery and clinical research for more than 20 years. He was the first recipient of the Arturo and Holly Melosi Professor of Ophthalmology Chair and was a physician at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) for 17 years. Dr. Solomon held key positions at MUSC, including Director of the cataract, refractive and cornea services at Storm Eye Institute, Medical Director of the Magill Vision Center and Director of the Magill Research Center.

Dr Solomon completed his internship at Yale University in New Haven, CT, and his residency at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY. He completed his fellowship at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD, specializing in cataract and refractive surgery and corneal transplantation. He also completed a fellowship in ophthalmic pathology at the University Of Utah Health Sciences Center. Dr Solomon was recruited to Storm Eye Institute upon completion of his training at Johns Hopkins. A board-certified member of the American Board of Ophthalmology, Dr. Solomon is a member of many national and international professional and scientific societies often serving in leadership roles. He is currently Chair of the Food and Drug Administration liaison committee for the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS), the largest surgical society for eye surgeons in the world. Additionally, Dr. Solomon has authored more than 170 publications and has received numerous awards including receiving the “Best Doctors” award every year since 2002. Since its inception in 2005, he has been voted by his peers as being one of the top 50 opinion leaders around the world for cataract and refractive surgery, and he was the second recipient of the Lee Nordan Refractive Surgeon of the Year Award.

Dr. Solomon is sought after world-wide for his teaching and surgical skills. He frequently presents lectures to peers, having presented more than 500 lectures and live surgical demonstrations. Most recently, Dr. Solomon was the United States representative and invited guest for the Russian Cataract and Refractive Surgery Society in Moscow.

Carolina Eyecare Physicians’ Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Isn’t it true that most clinical research studies are performed at universities?

Dr. Kerry Solomon Dr. Kerry Solomon: No, in fact, some of the most important contributions to clinical research have come from the private sector. I have always had an academic practice, with a desire to improve what we offer patients both today and tomorrow. Academic research is more a state of mind than a location. My colleagues at Carolina Eyecare share my dedication to academic research, and we will continue to work to improve the field of ophthalmology.

Why has the Carolina Eyecare Physician’s organization expanded into research?

Dr. John Boatwright Dr. John Boatwright: Research is the backbone of future developments in vision advancements. At Carolina Eyecare Physicians, we are committed to developing and testing the latest cutting-edge technology. This is our passion and our desire. In this way, we can improve the quality of our patient’s lives around the lowcountry and beyond.

As a patient, should it be important to me that Carolina Eyecare Physicians has a Research Institute?

Dr. Paul Herring Dr. Paul Herring: Yes, absolutely. It’s the involvement with clinical research that provides me and my fellow Carolina Eyecare colleagues with a unique perspective on the best and latest advancements and surgical techniques in eyecare. Through research, we can best advise and help guide you and your family and friends to the treatment(s) best suited to you. In choosing a doctor, you want a physician that is not only familiar with the latest technology, medications or surgical techniques, but one who actively participates in these studies.

As a patient, is there any benefit for me to participate in a clinical study?

Dr. Robert Reuther Dr. Robert Reuther: There are many benefits to participating in clinical studies. Of course, study participants receive advanced technology before the general public. Just as important, your participation may help benefit many other patients in the future. Studies provide an opportunity for you to collaborate together with me, my fellow physicians, and our staff. You can help us achieve our goal to advance what modern medicine has to offer.

Can I participate in the studies even if I live outside of the Charleston area?

Dr. Thomas Newland Dr. Thomas Newland: Yes, provided you can keep the necessary appointments required by the study. As Carolina Eyecare has expanded, so has our geographic coverage. We now have office locations in the Charleston area (West Ashley, North Charleston, Mount Pleasant), in Summerville (Across the street from Summerville Medical Center), Moncks Corner and Walterboro. Patients from these areas and beyond may participate.

Is there a research staff dedicated specifically to research at Carolina Eyecare?

Dr. Helga Sandoval Dr. Helga Sandoval: I was the manager of the Magill Research Center at Storm Eye Institute for 8 years. With Dr Solomon’s transition and the opening of the Carolina Eyecare Research Institute, I was recruited to manage the new center. I am looking forward to helping assist the physicians and staff at Carolina Eyecare bring these exciting studies to you and other patients around the lowcountry and beyond. We will be very busy as there are many new ophthalmology advancements being developed. This is an exciting time.

Are you a candidate for our clinical trials?

For more information about participating in Carolina Eyecare Research Institute studies, please contact Research Manager at Carolina Eyecare Research Institute, Dr. Helga Sandoval at 843-722-2010 or submit the form below.

Current Studies

Symfony Toric Intraocular Lens Visual Outcomes

In July 2016, the FDA approved an extended depth of focus (EDOF) IOL (Tecnis Symfony, Abbott Medical Optics) helping to improve the sharpness of vision at near, intermediate and far distances reducing the need of glasses after cataract surgery. It is available in both a non-toric version and a toric version for patients with astigmatism. The difference between this lens and the multifocal (MIOL) counterpart is that the EDOF, similarly to a monofocal IOL, has one focal point (elongated in the EDOF) while the multifocals have 2 focal points; therefore, having less of a halo and glare problem. Pivotal trial results where Symfony was compared to a monofocal IOL showed similar uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCDVA), better intermediate (77% vs. 34% 20/25 uncorrected intermediate visual acuity - UCIVA) and near vision (Symfony patients were able to read two additional, progressively smaller lines compared to the monofocal IOL).A One potential disadvantage of the EDOF IOL compared to a MIOL is the visual performance at near.B One option to deal with this potential shortcoming is to set the non-dominant eye for a small residual myopic error (-0.50 D)C what is referred to as nano-vision or mini mono-vision.

Optimizing the Assessment of Refractive Outcomes After Cataract Surgery

The purpose of this study is to evaluate current available assessments (automated vs. manual) with which manifest refraction data and biometric variables are obtained to understand if data from an automated refractor can be utilized to optimize the A-constant as well as manual subjective refraction (ie, to a clinically insignificant difference). The A-constant is the calculated number that helps the surgeon determine which IOL should be implanted in the eye during cataract surgery.

Clinical Evaluation of the Lenstec SBL-3 Multifocal Intraocular Lens

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and performance of the SBL-3 intraocular lens.

Compensation is available for qualifying patients. Enrollment is limited. Medicare & most insurance accepted.

Call (843) 375 1486 to find out if you may qualify!

Past Studies

Laser-assisted Cataract surgery study

If you have been diagnosed with cataracts in one or both eyes and have astigmatism, you may qualify for this research study. This study investigates the clinical results of an Image Guided System used in the planning and completion of laser assisted cataract surgery for the treatment of pre-existing astigmatism using corneal incisions when combined with a lens that has been designed to provide both near and far vision.

Monofocal lens evaluation

This research study evaluated the visual outcomes after implantation of a standard (monofocal) intraocular lens after routine cataract extraction. Patients undergoing cataract surgery who meet inclusion/exclusion criteria were eligible to participate..

Glaucoma Treatment May Reduce Need for Eye Drops

Dr. Solomon and the team of Carolina Eyecare Physicians evaluated a new treatment for patients with mild to moderate glaucoma and cataracts. This micro-bypass stent was implanted in the eye during cataract surgery to reduce or eliminate the need for eye drops in some patients. The stent is designed to reduce intraocular pressure and prevent further vision loss due to glaucoma.

Glaucoma treatment involving the use of punctal plugs

The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of punctal plugs containing anti-glaucoma medication compared to topical drops of the same type of medication. Patients with ocular hypertension or mild open angle glaucoma with adequate intraocular pressure control using only one topical medication (either Xalatan, Travatan, Travatan Z, or Lumigan) for the past 1 month who meet inclusion/exclusion criteria were eligible to participate. Study related exams and study related medication were provided at no cost.

Bladeless LASIK outcomes

Visual outcomes and satisfaction with the latest technology for customized LASIK is being evaluated. Patients undergoing bilateral LASIK to correct nearsightedness were eligible to participate.

Newest Premium Replacement Lens Implants to Correct Presbyopia and Cataracts

Dr. Solomon was one of the principal investigators of implantable premium replacement lenses, including the original ReSTOR® lens. Dr. Solomon recently conducted clinical trials with the latest generation lens, the ReSTOR +3.0 D. Results were impressive with patients experiencing improved vision for reading, better intermediate vision for tasks such as computer work and clearer distance vision.

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